Guru Dragpo Puja


From the Kopan Monastery website:

As Buddhists, Tibetans believe that if you want good circumstances, you yourself need to establish good conditions.  Losar rituals are concerned with inspiring a creative attitude, to establish a basis for a good new year.  On these first days of the year Tibetans engage in specific virtuous actions, and acts that are considered auspicious.

Losar-Puja

Moreover, in the days that precede Losar, the last days of the old year, everyone in the community is concerned with pacifying and removing left-over negativity.

During this time, Tibetan monasteries and temples undertake specific rites to expel negative habits from the old year, so these will not be carried into the New Year.  The lamas and monks will do a week of rituals, some of which culminate in the well-known lama dances. Moreover, in their homes, families prepare for the New Year by cleaning, and making new clothes.

From the Amitabha Foundation’s newsletter:

The annual Guru Dragpo puja at Ayang Rinpoche’s monastery in Bylakuppe, India, begins February 8 and continues through February 14, 2018.  Guru Dragpo is practiced at the end of the Tibetan lunar year to dispel obstacles and purify any remaining negativities in order to usher in happiness and prosperity for the New Year (Losar), which is February 16th this year.

Ayang Rinpoche Puja 2017

We invite you to make an offering to help support the puja.

Ayang Rinpoche has said that anyone sponsoring Dharma activities gains the same merit as the practitioners.

Make a donation online here, or send a check made out to Amitabha Foundation.

You may include a dedication for your offering in the name of a loved one, living or deceased, including pets.  All names must be submitted to the Amitabha Foundation by February 12 at 5 PM Pacific Standard Time.

Your donation of any amount will be appreciated and will be like a drop of water mixed in an ocean of merit!

Becky Loy
for H. E. Chöje Ayang Rinpoche and the Amitabha Foundation
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Filed under Emotional Health, Mental Health, Tibetan Buddhism

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