Tag Archives: Buddhism

Guru Dragpo Puja

From the Kopan Monastery website:

As Buddhists, Tibetans believe that if you want good circumstances, you yourself need to establish good conditions.  Losar rituals are concerned with inspiring a creative attitude, to establish a basis for a good new year.  On these first days of the year Tibetans engage in specific virtuous actions, and acts that are considered auspicious.


Moreover, in the days that precede Losar, the last days of the old year, everyone in the community is concerned with pacifying and removing left-over negativity.

During this time, Tibetan monasteries and temples undertake specific rites to expel negative habits from the old year, so these will not be carried into the New Year.  The lamas and monks will do a week of rituals, some of which culminate in the well-known lama dances. Moreover, in their homes, families prepare for the New Year by cleaning, and making new clothes.

From the Amitabha Foundation’s newsletter:

The annual Guru Dragpo puja at Ayang Rinpoche’s monastery in Bylakuppe, India, begins February 8 and continues through February 14, 2018.  Guru Dragpo is practiced at the end of the Tibetan lunar year to dispel obstacles and purify any remaining negativities in order to usher in happiness and prosperity for the New Year (Losar), which is February 16th this year.

Ayang Rinpoche Puja 2017

We invite you to make an offering to help support the puja.

Ayang Rinpoche has said that anyone sponsoring Dharma activities gains the same merit as the practitioners.

Make a donation online here, or send a check made out to Amitabha Foundation.

You may include a dedication for your offering in the name of a loved one, living or deceased, including pets.  All names must be submitted to the Amitabha Foundation by February 12 at 5 PM Pacific Standard Time.

Your donation of any amount will be appreciated and will be like a drop of water mixed in an ocean of merit!

Becky Loy
for H. E. Chöje Ayang Rinpoche and the Amitabha Foundation

Leave a comment

Filed under Emotional Health, Mental Health, Tibetan Buddhism

Heart Advice

H.H. Yangthang left a letter to his niece’s daughter before he passed into nirvana.  This letter was found in his personal bag after his parinirvana.  We believe that this letter is also the last teaching he bestowed to all of us.  We are very grateful to Sangye Khandro, who translated this letter into English for all of us.

Yangthang Rinpoche3b


Although you are still young, this is the time when your mind is fresh and clear. Now is the time to carefully consider your present human life and what will follow this.  The wise ones of the past have said, “If you plan ahead, it is smart.  If you regret later it is dumb.”  So, that means you must carefully consider finding the correct direction to take that will benefit this life and the future.  Once you have found this then it is extremely important to pursue that path whole heartedly.  Once inadvertently entering the wrong direction it is difficult to turn around and reenter the right way even if you want to.  You won’t be able to instantly turn around so from the onset it is best to get this right.

In short there are two paths to take, the worldly and the spiritual path.  If you take the worldly path both this and the future life will be involved with suffering.  This direction is very challenging because it involves the path of negativity and non-virtue.  The spiritual path is the direction that illuminates fully endowed happiness and wellbeing both temporarily and ultimately.  Even though that is the case, these days there are very few who chose to enter this illuminating path.

Among the seven point three billion inhabitants of this planet, there are only several hundred thousand who are following the path of dharma.  Everyone else is pursuing the worldly path.

By only establishing non-virtue, then due to the power of negativity they must powerlessly pursue a misguided direction that leads to suffering.  Having attained this precious human life just this once, they are distracted by meaningless activities on the path of cyclic existence and without even noticing their life is wasted.  One day when death arrives they must leave behind this world, their loving parents, relatives, abundance and even their cherished body and enter their future life with eyes full of tears.  Having spent their life only accumulating non-virtue they can only take rebirth in the three lower realms.  Revolving within the three lower realms repeatedly, after some hundreds and thousands of human years they may take rebirth just once in a higher place.  Experiencing continuous suffering for such a long time, by circling throughout the six realms, there will be no chance to achieve freedom from this.


This kind of worldly direction is a vast heap of suffering.  Since it endures for so long it is actually a very frightening path.  Due to the power of negative karma all humans will powerlessly proceed down this undesirable direction.  That is why you, young girl, must make prayers that you can avoid this direction!  If due to your karma you end up having to go there, please keep this advice strongly in your heart:

Don’t react with frustration and try to make decisions by yourself; listen to the advice of your parents and elders who have good intentions; respect the advice of those with knowledge and learn to trust the Triple Gem and divinations concerning your future.

Always look within yourself with careful consideration and walk with firm steps in the positive direction without mindlessly engaging in chaotic activities.

If you wish to choose the path of the sublime dharma, that would be the best!  That is the correct illuminating path and it is the unmistaken way to go!  First it is important to single pointedly trust in the Triple Gem and firmly cherish the advice of parents and elders, and listen and guard the teachings given to you from compassionate masters, monks and excellent practitioners.  Keep your own mind stable and focused and without wavering enter this luminous path.  First purely accomplish your own purpose and then work to benefit others.

Meditation with Universe

If you, young girl can enter this path of the Buddha then in order to practice dharma you must study and learn the Tibetan language.  This is very important.  You must be diligent in studying Tibetan.  Although it may be challenging, it will allow you to accomplish a greater purpose.  Right now your focus is on worldly subjects in ordinary school.  Through this knowledge you will only learn that which benefits the practical aspects of survival for this life alone.  For example, you will learn how to get food, wealth, name, fame reputation and status.  All those philosophers who are learned in western subjects such as science are able to identify that which is invisible to ordinary people.

Nevertheless, although they see and extract that which is precious among the external four elements, have made medical discoveries that cure diseases, are able to benefit and protect their own direction and deliver that which is harmful to others, are expert in discovering substances that bring both benefit and harm into this world; their capacity to be omniscient is still extremely limited.

If we compare that to the omniscience of the Buddha, then from a spiritual perspective the capacity of the buddha is equal to space.  There is not even a hair’s worth of anything that cannot and is not known.  That is called being fully and completely omniscient.

If you come to understand the dharma that is taught by such an omniscient Buddha then your own mind will become like the sky and will never be rigid. Your entire being will be open and free.  Since the teachings of the Buddha are full of such temporary and ultimate benefit to yourself and all others if you can learn even a little bit of this dharma that will bring tremendous achievement.

Please hold this advice deep within your heart.

Leave a comment

Filed under Masters, Tibetan Buddhism

Losar Celebration

Tibetan New year, also known as Losar, is the most important festival in the Tibetan calendar.  It is mainly celebrated over a period of 3 days in late January or February, according to the Tibetan calendar.  This year, Friday February 16th, will begin the year of the Earth Dog.


Buddhist Tradition:

From the Chagdudgonpa website:

Kilaya rituals are traditionally practiced during the final lunar month of the Tibetan calendar to dispel obstacles before the new year begins (Losar).  At Rigdzin Ling we will practice three days of Padgyal Lingpa’s terma of Padmakilaya, followed by three days of HH Dudjom Rinpoche’s terma of Vajrakilaya, The Razor that Destroys at a Touch.

Kilaya Drubchöd

(Padmakilaya:  February 10 – 12, 2018 | Vajrakilaya:  February 13 – 15, 2018)


Padmakilaya was directly transmitted to Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche from Padgyal Lingpa, where it became the wrathful guru practice that Rinpoche practiced for decades.  It was then passed on to Tulku Sang-ngag Rinpoche who bestowed it several times at Rigdzin Ling, authorizing Lama Padma Gyatso to uphold and propagate this powerful antidote to harmful influences and emotions.

Chagdud Tulku quote

Vajrakilaya brings the practitioner into direct contact with the display of compassionate wrath, the intense energy of enlightened activity that subdues the forces of negativity.  Guru Rinpoche transmitted this method of accomplishing Vajrakilaya to his heart disciple, Yeshe Tsogyal, who made it her main practice and was the source of her extraordinary spiritual attainment.

If you are unable to attend the event but would like to participate, it is meritorious and virtuous activity to offer Butterlamps and tsog

Dedications will be read during the event.

Click here for more information.

Butter Lamp Offerings:

H.E. Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche explains:

“What is the meaning of butter lamp offerings? 

We do not offer the lamps because enlightened beings need to see them.  Rather, the offering of light is a means of dispelling the darkness of our own ignorance, giving rise to clarity and wisdom.  We offer them with the wish that their light will illuminate the lower realms and the bardo, assuaging the torment of beings who suffer in darkness.

“Of all the methods for accumulating merit through generosity, offering butter lamps is second only to the practice of tsok.” — Chagdud Tulku

We also aspire that all beings will develop greater mental clarity in order to discover the causes of long-lasting happiness in virtuous actions of body, speech, and mind.  Finally, we offer them so that the inner light of great knowing will arise in all beings’ minds and remove the darkness of ignorance and intellectual obscurations.”

Buddhas Great Miracles:

From the Kalachakrablog website:

The first full moon (March 2, 2018) in the Tibetan lunar calendar is celebrated as the Day of Miracles, or Chotrul Duchen, which commemorates the final day of miraculous display by the Buddha which lasted 15 days.  The Buddha performed the miracles in response to a challenge from six rival teachers.  These 15 days are merit‐multiplying days in which any virtue created is magnified millions of times.

“This is the best and most exciting time, whatever practice or virtue we do, the merit is increased 100 million times.” — Lama Zopa Rinpoche

The Day of Miracles is also the most special day of Monlam Chenmo, the Great Prayer Festival, where thousands of people, lay and ordained alike, pray, and make offerings of food, tea, lights or money to the Sangha.

Tashi Delek

Leave a comment

Filed under Masters, Tibetan Buddhism

Chatral Rinpoche’s Parinirvana

Chatral Rinpoche1

From the Compassionate Action website:

Early Life:

At the age of 15, Chatral Rinpoche decided to leave his family (circa 1928) in order to study and practice Buddhism with the masters of the area.  This act of renunciation began his life-long journey as a carefree yogi seeking Enlightenment at any cost in order to effectively help other beings with compassion.  From the onset, Rinpoche was highly principled, traveling exclusively on foot and refusing a horse when offered. He stayed only in hermitages, caves or his small tent to avoid involvement with householders and their worldly preoccupations.

Chatral Rinpoche met his root guru, Khenpo Ngawang Palzang (1879-1941) of Kathok Monastery.  The great Khenpo had been the heart disciple of Patrul Rinpoche’s main student, Lungtok Tenpai Nyima (1829-1901), and was considered to be a manifestation of the 9th Century Dzogchen master Vimalamitra.

Khenpo Ngakchung gave Chatral Rinpoche many teachings and transmissions particularly of the Longchen Nyinthig tradition.  For the next six years Rinpoche studied under him, completing his ngondro and practicing trekchod and togyal, which are some of the most advanced practices of Dzogchen.


Khenpo Ngawang Palzang knew Rinpoche was very special and acknowledged him to be his closest disciple, explaining that, his mind and my mind are no different.  He bestowed upon Rinpoche the name Chatral Sangye Dorje, which means “Indestructible Buddha who has Abandoned all Mundane Activities.”

The first time Chatral Rinpoche’s greatness became revealed to others was at a large worship service at Kathok Monastery, attended by several high lamas sitting on lofty thrones. Rinpoche sat in the back on a simple meditation cushion with a few hundred other monks.  Khenpo Ngawang Palzang remarked during the service: “Among all of you here today, there are less than ten people who have one-tenth of my realization.  Then, there are less than five of you who have half of my realization.”

“Finally, there is only one person here whose realization is no different from mine, and he is Chatral Sangye Dorje.  He can now represent me to transmit the teachings and his merits are the same as mine.” — Khenpo Ngawang Palzang

This proclamation caused quite a stir in the assembly hall and afterward people came to congratulate Rinpoche.  Preparations began for a grand ceremony to honor Rinpoche in his new status.  Rinpoche was not one for all this attention and praise and so snuck away in the middle of the night with his tent to continue his practice alone in the wilderness.  The next day when they came to honor him, they found his room empty with no trace of where he went.  Once again, he lived up to his name Chatral, which can be translated as hermit.

Chatral Rinpoche once explained, “We abide nowhere, we possess nothing.”   In the ultimate sense, this is a profound statement on the impermanence of life and emptiness of all things.  In the conventional sense, this is how a yogi like Chatral Rinpoche actually lived in Tibet.  Having no household or possessions to weigh on one’s mind, one is completely free to practice the Dharma.

Strict Principles:

Chatral Rinpoche was renowned for being incorruptible and insistent on doing things the right way.  In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, when someone dies, it is standard to leave them for three days to allow ample time for the consciousness to leave the body and hopefully enter into a Pureland realm or at least a high rebirth.

From the AnimalPeopleForum Chatral Rinpoche exclaimed:

“I was the first to become vegetarian since we came to India. The first year of the Nyingma Monlam in Bodh Gaya was non-vegetarian.  In the second year I came there and spoke at a meeting of all the high Nyingma Lamas.”

“I told them that Bodh Gaya is a very special place which is holy to all Buddhists, and if we say we are gathered here for the Nyingma Monlam and yet eat meat, this is a disgrace and the greatest insult to Buddhism.  I said they should all give up meat from now on, during the Nyingma Monlam.” — Chatral Rinpoche

He went on to say, “Even the Tibetan lamas and monks eat meat!  What a shame if even the lamas can’t give up meat! First the lamas should commit themselves to being life-long vegetarians.  If the Lamas become vegetarian, then you can address the lay people. Then also you should urge the monks to become vegetarian. Otherwise if knowledgeable religious people eat meat, how can one expect the ignorant public, who follow along just like sheep, to become vegetarian?”

Chatral Rinpoche was very selective about those he actually gave teachings to.  He was fully aware that most of the people who ask him for teachings are not a fraction as serious about their practice as he is, so doesn’t bother to waste the precious nectar of his teachings on an unsuitable vessel.

“There are three kinds of Dharma practitioners: firstly, there are those who look like practitioners outwardly, but inwardly they are not real practitioners; secondly, there are those who talk very high, but have no realization at all; thirdly there are those who do not look like practitioners outwardly, but who are in fact genuine practitioners inside.” — Chatral Rinpoche

Therefore as a strict rule, Rinpoche never transmitted any higher-level teachings to those who have studied with him for less than six years sufficient time for them to prove themselves as genuine practitioners.


Despite the adulation of countless thousands in the Himalayan region, Rinpoche remains as humble as ever.  He once said, “I am just an ordinary sentient being and there is nothing special about me.  I just follow the teachings of Lord Buddha.  Without any cheating on my part, I stand firmly on the ground in practicing the Dharma and in helping all sentient beings.”

“I wish that all sentient beings could let go of the acts of self-deception and self-aggrandizement, so that they can really practice the Dharma in order to liberate themselves from cyclic existence and to help other sentient beings.  Otherwise, it will be too late when they are feeling remorseful!” — Chatral Rinpoche

On December 30th, 2015, Kyabje Chatral Sangye Dorje begin the transition to Parinirvana.  He remained in tukdam meditation until January 5th, 2016, when he attained Parinirvana.  Chatral Rinpoche passed in the 10th month on the 20th day of the Tibetan Lunar Calendar.  This Friday, December 8th, will be a great time to make butterlamp offerings and ganachakra tsok feasts in honor of this great master.

Tsok Dates:

  • 2016 – December 18th
  • 2017 – December 8th

Texts & Prayers:

Some writings of Chatral Rinpoche that include prayers, practices, pilgrimages, and words of advice:  Lotsawa House


Leave a comment

Filed under Masters, Parinirvana, Tibetan Buddhism

Cyber Shedra

I received this email today that may be of interest to the serious student of the dharma:

Namdroling, Montana and Khenpo Tenzin Norgay Rinpoche are happy to again offer the distance learning program, Cyber Shedra.  Cyber Shedra was established by Namdroling Montana and Khenpo Norgay in 2004 in order to help serious Dharma students receive pure Buddhist teachings.

This is an exceptionally rare opportunity for students whose lives are mingled with the world and worldly responsibilities.  A uniqueness of this program is that you study from your computer when and where it is convenient for you.

Who teaches these sessions?

The teachings are given by Khenpo Tenzin Norgay Rinpoche from the Palyul Tradition of Tibetan Buddhism.  Participants have the opportunity to receive teachings from and communicate questions to master Buddhist teacher Khenpo Norgay via email and the web.  Lessons, assignments, practice instructions, and written question and answer sessions are incorporated into the program.

For those who are interested, definitions of Tibetan/Sanskrit terms found in Session 1 lessons are also available. Please check our website for a biography of:  Khenpo-la.

How long is each session?

Each session progresses over an eight-month period (October to May).  The fall sessions begin anytime between today’s date and November 7, 2017.  Your start date will depend on when we receive your registration.

How do I register?

You may register any time between now and November 7, 2017.  We request that you take the sessions in sequence.  A student should take Session 1 before taking Session 2, and take Sessions 1 and 2 before taking Session 3, etc.

(If you plan to register but cannot send your fee until November 7, you may send us an email at cyshedra@namdrolingmt.org and we will begin sending your class materials in October.)

More details:

Shedra is a Tibetan word meaning “place of teaching” that refers to the traditional educational program in Tibetan Buddhist monasteries and nunneries among all four schools of Buddhism.  Shedra participants may be ordained or lay  students who attend these high-level courses in the Buddhist Philosophical University and upon completion one becomes a Khenpo or professor of Buddhism.

A general curriculum that is normally offered (from wiki):

Nyingma Lineage

The shedra at Namdroling Monastery (in Bylakuppe, India) includes specific phases of study with particular texts used in each phase.  Commentaries by Ju Mipham or Khenpo Shenga may be used with each text.  The phases and texts include:

  • First year
    • Training on the prātimokṣa, bodhisattva, and samaya vows using Treatise Ascertaining the Three Vows by Pema Wangyal
    • Bodhisattvacaryāvatāra by Shantideva
    • Grammar, Poetry, and History
  • Second through fifth years
    • Psychology using Abhidharmakosha by Vasubandhu, Abhidharmasamuccaya by Asanga, and Pramanavarttika by Dharmakirti
    • Madhyamaka philosophy texts including Mūlamadhyamakakārikā, Chatuhshataka-shastrakarika (The Four Hundred Verses on the Middle Way) of Aryadeva, Madhyamakāvatāra, and Madhyamakalankara
  • Upper phase
    • Yogacara philosophy using the five treatises of Maitreya via Asanga, including Gyulama (Mahayanottaratantrashastra or Ratnagotravibhāga), Abhisamayalankara, Mahāyāna-sūtrālamkāra-kārikā, Madhyānta-vibhāga-kārikā (Distinguishing the Middle from the Extremes) and Dharma-dharmatā-vibhāga (Distinguishing Phenomena and Pure Being)
    • Additional study on the vows and monastic discipline
  • Tantra phase for two or three years
    • Specific tantras like the Guhyagarbha tantra
    • Dzogchen commentaries like Yonten Dzod by Jigme Lingpa, Rangdrol Korsum (Trilogy of Self Liberation), and Ngelso Korsum (Trilogy of Resting)
    • Additional study on the eight precepts of practice and related topics

If you are interested…a complete description of the program and how it is run, a biography of Khenpo Tenzin Norgay, and a link to registration can be found here:

Cyber Shedra Montana

Contact Us:

For questions please contact: cyshedra@namdrolingmt.org

Tashi Delek,

Leave a comment

Filed under Masters, Tibetan Buddhism

Building Stupas

The Importance of Stupas

from the Padmasambhava website:stupas representation

The benefits of building stupas were spoken of by the buddha in the Noble Amazing Sutra:

Ananda! Any devoted noble sons and daughters who fill this entire three-thousand-fold universe with the seven precious metals and make offerings to all the stream-enterers, once-returners, non-returners, and arhats—as well as all the sangha members in the four directions—do not accumulate as much merit as someone who makes a stupa to the Tathagata—the Subduer, the Perfectly Enlightened One, the One Who Entered Mahaparinirvana— that is even the size of a churura seed, with a central column the size of a needle, an umbrella the size of a juniper leaf, and filled with grain-sized statues and mustard seed-sized relics.

Moreover, in the Analyzing Activity Sutra, the Buddha said to the brahmin son Netso:

Whoever builds the Stupa of the Tathagata will gain the eighteen benefits. These are: (1) to be born in a royal family, (2) with perfect features (3) and a beautiful body; (4) who everybody loves to see (5) and looks to as a leader; (6) with fame expanding in the ten directions, (7) beautiful cheering sounds, (8) and praised with beautiful verses; (9) very detached from the world (10) and honored by gods (11) and humans; (12) very wealthy, (13) with a long life (14) and as healthy and strong as a vajra; (15) possessing the major marks (16) and minor marks; (17) born in the upper realms; (18) and soon to enter the supreme enlightened state.

Boudhanath Stupa Stunning Buddhist stupa of Tibetan in Nepal-3

In the Noble Lotus Sutra, the Buddha said:

Whoever makes a stupa out of stones, agarwood, or sandalwood; or whoever makes a stupa with joy out of medicinal wood or even out of plain wood, earth, brick, and so on; or whoever makes a stupa by just using heaps of earth in some remote area while thinking of the Buddha; or even children who make a stupa while playing games with sand while thinking of the Victorious One; or whoever draws forms (of the Buddha)—they will all reach enlightenment.

The Manjushrimitra Root Tantra states:

(Those who want) to purify their negativities should make a stupa with their own hands—it will cleanse even the worst five obscurations. If they make 100,000 stupas, they will become a universal monarch among all the vidyadharas. Whoever contacts such a stupa will develop great wisdom and long life, and even if they die, they will be reborn in the higher realms in a royal clan, and they will never go to the lower realms. When born, their intelligence will be like a blazing sun, their intellect will become stable, and they will remember past lives. Thus it is said.

Moreover, the Noble Stainless Beams of Light Sutra states:

Noble sons and daughters! Whoever circumambulates or make offerings to a stupa will be blessed by Tathagatas, move to the supreme enlightened state through a non-returning path, and purify all of their karmic obscurations. Even if the shadow of a stupa touches birds, animals, deer, or whomever, they will not be reborn in the lower realms.

Thus, in the sutras and tantras the Buddha taught extensively about the benefits of building stupas, as well as the benefits to those who support and make contact with stupas.

A big Tibetan Buddhist chorten found just south of Ganze, Tibet (China).

Creating Virtue:

You can begin by clicking here to donate to the 100,000 Stupas Around the World project by Lama Zopa Rinpoche

Building stupas helps develop so much peace and happiness for numberless sentient beings.  As a result, wars, disease, and desire will all be pacified.  Instead of feeling hopeless, people will gain courage. — Lama Zopa Rinpoche



Leave a comment

Filed under Buddhist sutras, Masters, Tibetan Buddhism

The Fishwife

The Buddha is in a state of unmoving suchness, but when someone wants to protect the Buddhadharma and help people become Buddhas, it nonetheless makes him happy.

At that time, the World Honored One praised Ananda in front of the whole assembly, saying, “Good indeed!” The Buddha was pleased. “You’re really fine, Ananda. How good it is”, he praises him twice, that you have asked how to establish a Bodhimanda and to rescue and protect living beings who are sunk in the morass of the final age. You want to help beings in the Dharma-ending Age who are being drowned in the water and consumed by the fire. Listen well, now, and I will tell you.”


Guan  Yin Bodhisattva

Ananda and the great assembly agreed to uphold the teaching. When they heard the Buddha agree to speak the dharma, their joy was even greater. The Buddha probably said, “Do you want to listen to this?”

Everyone undoubtedly answered, “We want to. We want to.” When deviant teachers explain their methods, their sole topic is sexual desire. The things they say are unprincipled. This should be distinguished clearly. Sometimes Bodhisattvas also use compassion, kind words, and a protective heart to teach living beings, because they know that all living beings are steeped in desire. Every living being has thoughts of sexual desire. So he does not expect them to cut off their love and desire immediately, but he uses all kinds of expedient means to get them to see through and renounce sexual desire. Then they can put a stop to it themselves. This is the state of a Bodhisattva, totally different from that of the deviant teachers of externalist ways.

Once, Guan Yin Bodhisattva transformed into a fishmonger. She was an exquisite woman who went about the village with her fish-basket. No one in the village believed in the Hawthorne-The FishwifeBuddha. But when the young men of the village caught sight of this maiden, they desired her. The village wasn’t large, but there were at least a hundred young men there, and every one of them wanted to marry her.

Guan Yin with the fish-basket said, “There are so many of you! I can’t marry a hundred men, but I’ve thought of a method to choose a husband. I will marry whichever of the hundred of you is the first to be able to learn to recite by heart the ‘Universal Door Chapter’ of the Lotus Sutra. Go back home and I’ll give you three days.”

But, at the end of three days, there were forty or fifty who could recite it from memory. The woman with the fish basket said, “But there are still too many of you. Even though you have met the requirements, I can’t have fifty husbands. This time go back and within five days memorize the Vajra Sutra. I’ll marry whoever does that.”

So the fifty who’d made it to the first level went back and began to practice the Vajra Sutra. At the end of five days there were some twenty who could recite it by heart. The fish monger said, “There are still too many of you. It’s impossible for me to marry you all. I have one more task. Anyone who can memorize the Lotus Sutra in seven days will be my husband. I believe whoever can do that will be worthy.”

The twenty began to recite the Lotus Sutra, and at the end of seven days there was one man who could recite it from memory. He was named Ma, and came from a wealthy family. So there was a large wedding and everyone was invited. That evening, after the festivities, they retired, but who would have guessed that the bride would have a heart attack and die instantly? And the bridegroom had gone to so much effort! He’d memorized the “Universal Door Chapter,” the Vajra Sutra, and the Lotus Sutra, and still he had no bride. Shortly thereafter, the funeral took place, and a monk in purple robes appeared on the scene. “What’s going on?” he asked. “Our new daughter-in-law passed away suddenly, and we are burying her.”

“No,” said the monk. “There’s nothing in that coffin at all! Who are you mourning for? Open it and take a look.”


Indeed, the coffin was empty. They were all amazed. “Where’s she gone? After her! Bring her back!”

The monk told them, “That was Guan Yin Bodhisattva. You people in this village didn’t believe in the Buddha, so she manifested the appearance of a beautiful woman in order to get you young men who are so fond of forms to study the Buddhadharma. Then she left.”

When the bridegroom, Ma, heard that, he renounced all worldly things and left the home-life. After that, he was certified to the fruition of a sage. That really happened in China.

Story & Commentary by Venerable Master Hsuan Hua

1 Comment

Filed under Buddhist sutras, Masters

Benefits of the Festival of the Tenth Day

Taken in part from the Lotsawa House website:

guru rinpoche

On each one of these successive tenth day festivals, the specific benefits of observing the practice follow in this order:

In the sixth month, all kinds of illness, döns, and obstructors are pacified, and lifespan, merit and prosperity are increased.

In the twelfth month, happiness and sharpness of mind are accelerated and confidence increases, so that humans and non-humans are brought under your power.

In the first month, power, position and wealth will grow, and earth-lords and guardians obey you like servants.

In the second month, harm and damage caused by the lord of death and the eight classes of gods and spirits are pacified, discipline is purified, and unlimited wisdom blazes.

In the third month, you are untouched by harm from inauspicious conjunctions of planets and stars, and from enemies and thieves. At home and abroad, auspiciousness, peace and goodness increase everywhere.

In the fourth month, you will be immune to harm from earth-lords, nāgas and nyens, and dharmapālas and guardians will accomplish whatever activity you have entrusted to them.

In the fifth month, all harm from obstacles, enemies and döns is pacified, and the objects of your wishes are brought under your control.

In the seventh month, chronic ailments, weaknesses of the immune system and the like are purified, the body is healthy, the mind is happy, your entourage and wealth increase, and your aspirations are fulfilled.

In the eighth month, obstacles of the year, month, day and time, as well as evil signs and the like, are all pacified, and any decline in wangthang or lungta is restored.

In the ninth month, sickness and döns caused by the eight classes and jungpo demons, untimely death and fatal accidents all are pacified, serious curses are eliminated, you are freed from sorcery and psychic attacks, and your own body becomes vajra.

In the tenth month, wrongs and downfalls of the three vows such as disrespecting sacred objects, and breakages and impairments of samaya are all healed, and your mind stream is purified.

In the eleventh month, sudden misfortune, such as untimely death, will not occur, and as soon as we transfer from this life, we are born in the pure land of Lotus Light before Guru Rinpoche himself.

Not only are the benefits of observing the tenth day absolutely limitless, but for concentrating on the various practices of gathering merit and making prayers, these occasions are praised as extraordinarily special.

Composed by Jikdral Yeshe Dorje, Kyabjé Dudjom Rinpoche

Leave a comment

Filed under Tibetan Buddhism

Kilaya Drupchen

Kilaya Retreat 2017

Padmakilaya & Vajrakilaya 

with Lama Padma Gyatso

Feb 20th – 26th

Padmakilaya Empowerment: February 20th
Padmakilaya Practice: February 21st – 23rd
Vajrakilaya Practice: February 24th – 26th

Kilaya rituals are traditionally practiced during the final lunar month of the Tibetan calendar to dispel obstacles before the coming year begins (Losar). Rigdzin Ling will practice three days of Padgyal Lingpa’s terma of Padmakilaya, followed by three days of H. H. Dudjom Rinpoche’s terma of Vajrakilaya, The Razor That Destroys at a Touch. 

Padmakilaya is a revelation of the great terton, Padgyal Lingpa, who initially transmitted it directly to Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche. It became the wrathful guru practice that Rinpoche practiced exclusively for decades. It was then passed on to Tulku Sang-Ngag Rinpoche who bestowed it several times at Rigdzin Ling, authorizing Lama Padma to uphold and propagate it.

For those who wish to attend this retreat but have not received the empowerment for Vajrakilaya, there will be a blessing-permission given on the first day of the Vajrakilaya practice.

If you are unable to attend the event but would like to participate,
we encourage you to offer butterlamps and tsog

Dedications will be read during the event.

Click here for more information.

Leave a comment

Filed under Masters, Tibetan Buddhism

Pilgrimage to Tibet


Message from Dechen Yeshe Wangmo:

Dear Sangha,

Today, on Dudjom Rinpoche’s 30th Parinirvana Anniversary, I’m happy to announce my July 2017 Pilgrimage to Tibet! This year, we’re returning to Lhasa, Tsogyal Latso and Samye but then we’re venturing west to Everest, Kailash and Lake Manasarovar!

Everything’s in place for a sacred 19-days in Tibet for 12 pilgrims, including myself and Dechen Chodon, pilgrimage manager and trip leader.

Everything’s on the website at www.sangha-journeys.com

Everything’s ready to assist you in making this journey if it’s right for you!

Where are we going?
Lhasa (Jokhang, Ramoche, Potala, Lukhang), Tsetang Tsechu Stupa, Samye, Tsogyal Latso, Yamdrok Turquoise Lake, Gyanste Kubum Stupa, Shalu, Rong Puk, Mt. Everest Base Camp, Mt. Kailash (3-day circumambulation), Manasarovar Lake and Guge Kingdom!

Don’t delay. There’s early bird pricing!

Head-on over to the website and let us know if we can be of assistance

Tashi Delek!
Lama Dechen Yeshe Wangmo
PS: Don’t miss the Full Itinerary —detailed descriptions and photos to enjoy!


Leave a comment

Filed under Masters, Tibetan Buddhism