Tag Archives: vajrayana

Kalu Rinpoche’s Parinirvana


Another important master that has come to this Saha world is Kalu Rinpoche.  His Parinirvana is tomorrow, May 20th.  Not without controversy, we certainly can learn a lot from this great, compassionate master.

Kalu-Rinpoche

Beneficial Quotes:

From the book The Dharma: That Illuminates All Beings Impartially Like the Light of the Sun and the Moon

Kalu Rinpoche tells us, “Whether we follow the scholastic or meditative approach really depends on our inclination, but regardless of how extensive or specialized our interest may be, some intellectual basis is certainly necessary. ”

“It is said that someone who tries to meditate without a conceptual understanding of what he or she is doing is like a blind person trying to find the way in the open country: such a person can only wander about, with no idea how to choose one direction over another.” — Kalu Rinpoche

From the Kagyu website:

“If we can practice bodhicitta, develop patience, and pacify all disharmony in our own home, then we have prepared the way leading to the development of limitless bodhicitta.”  He continues…

“If, on the other hand, we cannot maintain patience and harmony in our own home with our own family, then it is very unlikely that we will be able to do this with respect to all sentient beings, who are infinite in number.” — Kalu Rinpoche

From the book Gently Whispered: Oral Teachings by the Very Venerable Kalu Rinpoche

“In the current general cultural milieu of the Western world, expression of desire allows emotions to be actively encouraged, actively stimulated, and over-blown, all within the contextual appreciation of this as something healthy. If one has a desire, one is encouraged to fulfill it.”  He goes on to say:

“If one has an emotion, one is encouraged to stimulate it, to bring it to development by expressing it. Generally, this is seen as a healthy thing to do, while actually, in terms of karmic development, this approach tends to create a disproportionate exaggeration of desire and attachment. — Kalu Rinpoche

The Four ‘Faults’ of Natural Awareness:

  1. So close you can’t see it.
  2. So deep you can’t fathom it.
  3. So simple you can’t believe it.
  4. So good you can’t accept it.
A pith instruction:

“The pure nature of mind – emptiness, lucidity and intelligence without limit – has always been inside us.” — Kalu Rinpoche

Offerings:

Offering candles, incense, butter-lamps with a good intention (to the Lama) will create a lot of good karma and positive merit but offering the Tsok Feasts will generate the most merit and wisdom together that will forever be stored in our mind-stream.

The Kalachakra Tantra of Holding the Qualities of the Lama teaches:

“The merit accumulated by making offerings on the anniversary of one’s lama will dispel negative karma and obscurations accrued for countless eons, like the rays of the sun dispelling darkness.

This merit is superior to that accumulated by all beings in the three thousand world systems who gained merit through venerating and serving the Buddha.

Moreover, this merit is greater than the merit accrued by donating eyes, curing disease, and dispelling the sorrow of beings who are blind, ill or tormented by suffering in the hell realms and who are as numerous as the dust particles of the three thousand world systems.”

Tsok Dates:

Kalu Rinpoche passed into parinirvana on May 10, 1989 which falls on the 5th day of the 4th Month of the Tibetan Lunar calendar.    Previous Ganachakra ceremonies have fallen on these days:

  • 2016: May 11th
  • 2017:  May 30th

The parinirvana date for this year is: May 20th, 2018

Once again bringing forth awareness of the wrong intention and bad behavior within the mind of deluded sentient beings, Kalu Rinpoche’s yangsi (present incarnation) speaks out.  With a sincere heart and good intention he raises our understanding what is happening in the hearts of evil people.

 

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Guru Dragpo Puja


From the Kopan Monastery website:

As Buddhists, Tibetans believe that if you want good circumstances, you yourself need to establish good conditions.  Losar rituals are concerned with inspiring a creative attitude, to establish a basis for a good new year.  On these first days of the year Tibetans engage in specific virtuous actions, and acts that are considered auspicious.

Losar-Puja

Moreover, in the days that precede Losar, the last days of the old year, everyone in the community is concerned with pacifying and removing left-over negativity.

During this time, Tibetan monasteries and temples undertake specific rites to expel negative habits from the old year, so these will not be carried into the New Year.  The lamas and monks will do a week of rituals, some of which culminate in the well-known lama dances. Moreover, in their homes, families prepare for the New Year by cleaning, and making new clothes.

From the Amitabha Foundation’s newsletter:

The annual Guru Dragpo puja at Ayang Rinpoche’s monastery in Bylakuppe, India, begins February 8 and continues through February 14, 2018.  Guru Dragpo is practiced at the end of the Tibetan lunar year to dispel obstacles and purify any remaining negativities in order to usher in happiness and prosperity for the New Year (Losar), which is February 16th this year.

Ayang Rinpoche Puja 2017

We invite you to make an offering to help support the puja.

Ayang Rinpoche has said that anyone sponsoring Dharma activities gains the same merit as the practitioners.

Make a donation online here, or send a check made out to Amitabha Foundation.

You may include a dedication for your offering in the name of a loved one, living or deceased, including pets.  All names must be submitted to the Amitabha Foundation by February 12 at 5 PM Pacific Standard Time.

Your donation of any amount will be appreciated and will be like a drop of water mixed in an ocean of merit!

Becky Loy
for H. E. Chöje Ayang Rinpoche and the Amitabha Foundation

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Losar Celebration


Tibetan New year, also known as Losar, is the most important festival in the Tibetan calendar.  It is mainly celebrated over a period of 3 days in late January or February, according to the Tibetan calendar.  This year, Friday February 16th, will begin the year of the Earth Dog.

Losar-Celebration

Buddhist Tradition:

From the Chagdudgonpa website:

Kilaya rituals are traditionally practiced during the final lunar month of the Tibetan calendar to dispel obstacles before the new year begins (Losar).  At Rigdzin Ling we will practice three days of Padgyal Lingpa’s terma of Padmakilaya, followed by three days of HH Dudjom Rinpoche’s terma of Vajrakilaya, The Razor that Destroys at a Touch.

Kilaya Drubchöd

(Padmakilaya:  February 10 – 12, 2018 | Vajrakilaya:  February 13 – 15, 2018)

 

Padmakilaya was directly transmitted to Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche from Padgyal Lingpa, where it became the wrathful guru practice that Rinpoche practiced for decades.  It was then passed on to Tulku Sang-ngag Rinpoche who bestowed it several times at Rigdzin Ling, authorizing Lama Padma Gyatso to uphold and propagate this powerful antidote to harmful influences and emotions.

Chagdud Tulku quote

Vajrakilaya brings the practitioner into direct contact with the display of compassionate wrath, the intense energy of enlightened activity that subdues the forces of negativity.  Guru Rinpoche transmitted this method of accomplishing Vajrakilaya to his heart disciple, Yeshe Tsogyal, who made it her main practice and was the source of her extraordinary spiritual attainment.

If you are unable to attend the event but would like to participate, it is meritorious and virtuous activity to offer Butterlamps and tsog

Dedications will be read during the event.

Click here for more information.

Butter Lamp Offerings:

H.E. Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche explains:

“What is the meaning of butter lamp offerings? 

We do not offer the lamps because enlightened beings need to see them.  Rather, the offering of light is a means of dispelling the darkness of our own ignorance, giving rise to clarity and wisdom.  We offer them with the wish that their light will illuminate the lower realms and the bardo, assuaging the torment of beings who suffer in darkness.

“Of all the methods for accumulating merit through generosity, offering butter lamps is second only to the practice of tsok.” — Chagdud Tulku

We also aspire that all beings will develop greater mental clarity in order to discover the causes of long-lasting happiness in virtuous actions of body, speech, and mind.  Finally, we offer them so that the inner light of great knowing will arise in all beings’ minds and remove the darkness of ignorance and intellectual obscurations.”

Buddhas Great Miracles:

From the Kalachakrablog website:

The first full moon (March 2, 2018) in the Tibetan lunar calendar is celebrated as the Day of Miracles, or Chotrul Duchen, which commemorates the final day of miraculous display by the Buddha which lasted 15 days.  The Buddha performed the miracles in response to a challenge from six rival teachers.  These 15 days are merit‐multiplying days in which any virtue created is magnified millions of times.

“This is the best and most exciting time, whatever practice or virtue we do, the merit is increased 100 million times.” — Lama Zopa Rinpoche

The Day of Miracles is also the most special day of Monlam Chenmo, the Great Prayer Festival, where thousands of people, lay and ordained alike, pray, and make offerings of food, tea, lights or money to the Sangha.

Tashi Delek
Neo

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Being a vegetarian


“You have recorded my conversation, so you should relate it to the people.  We are here at the place of Guru Rinpoche’s cave.  At this place, we are exchanging questions and answers.  It will be nice for other people to hear this.  When you make your book, put my interview at the beginning.  Thank you.”

Chatral-prayer

COMPASSIONATE ACTION – Chapter Two

Chatral Rinpoche’s Steadfast Commitment to Ethics

Chatral Rinpoche is renowned in the Tibetan community for his peerless spiritual discipline, especially when it comes to refraining from eating meat.  Meat eating is an entrenched aspect of Tibetan culture and there are very few who can do without it for long.  His Holiness the Dalai Lama became vegetarian in 1966, but when he got Hepatitis B the Tibetan doctors who support him insisted he start to eat meat again, which he continues to do today in moderate quantities.  A few contemporary masters—such as Kangyur Rinpoche—were also known for being strict vegetarians, but they are the exception.  When I was on the University of Wisconsin-Madison College Year in Nepal Program in 2000, I was studying how Tibetans view the cultural convergence of Buddhism and meat eating and Chatral Rinpoche was one of the main people I interviewed.  Here are some excerpts from that interview:

Question:  Why did you decide to stop eating meat?  How old were you when you made this decision?

Answer:  It is written in many Theravadayana and Mahayana texts that one should not eat meat.  There is also a Vajrayana text that says the same thing, that one should not enjoy meat or alcohol.  Because of this I am following the instructions of Shakyamuni Buddha.  Being a religious person, I don’t take meat or alcohol and at the same time I try to tell other people not to consume these things.  This is my reason—I’m just trying to motivate other people.  I was 47 years old when I went to Bodhgaya and made a vow to all of the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas to give up meat and alcohol.

Question:  Why do you think vegetarianism is an important aspect of practicing the Dharma?

Answer:  If you take meat, it goes against the vows one takes in seeking refuge in the Buddha, Dharma and Sangha.  Because when you take meat you have to take a being’s life.  So I gave it up.

Question:  Some claim that one can help the animals one eats by praying for them, and thus eating meat is compassionate.  Other than for the most accomplished yogis and lamas, what do you make of this claim?

Answer:  With supernatural powers gained through certain meditations, it is true that there are some realized beings who can revive animals from the dead and help them reach a higher rebirth or Enlightenment by consuming small amounts of their flesh.  But this is not done for sustenance, only for the purpose of helping that animal.  I personally do not have that power and because of that I never eat meat.  Eating meat in one’s diet is much different than eating flesh to liberate a being through supernatural powers.  I am just an ordinary practitioner who really doesn’t have these qualities.  So, if I ate meat it would be the same if you or any other lay person ate meat.  I would be committing sin and I would be getting negative karma.  I don’t pretend as if I have special powers and eat meat, I just avoid it altogether.

Question:  Do you know other lamas who are vegetarian?

Answer:  I know many of them from Tibet.  There are Nyingma, Sakya and Gelukpa vegetarians in Tibet. Compared to the many meat-eating lamas, vegetarian lamas are very few though.  I’m 88 and during my experience I have come across many lamas in Kham, Amdo—all parts of Tibet—who don’t eat meat.  There are lamas who eat meat and those who don’t.  At my monastery in Tibet there are also lamas who take meat and those who don’t.

Question:  Many Buddhist practitioners in the United States eat meat because their Tibetan lamas eat meat.  What do you make of this?

Answer:  Many great siddhas in India drank enormous amounts of alcohol and developed magical powers.  One of these mahasiddhas (Virupa) kept drinking alcohol all day and suspended the sun in the sky and kept it from setting.  Naropa, Tilopa—these were great masters.

If you can acquire supernatural powers, you don’t need to follow the same standards of normal people and you can drink alcohol and eat meat.  Those who have supernatural powers can still give great teachings and benefit all sentient beings.

So, if the teachers in America are of that level, ask all your friends to join them in drinking alcohol and eating meat (Rinpoche was being sarcastic with this response).  It all depends on the level of realization one has achieved.  A lama who enjoys meat and alcohol can still bring people on the right path, so long as they have developed supernatural powers.

Question:  Do you see Tibetan Buddhists in exile making a sincere effort to reduce their meat consumption and become vegetarian, or has meat eating become an entrenched aspect of Tibetan culture?

Answer:  In Tibet, there’s only meat and tsampa (roasted barley flour)—there is no other staple food. Tibet is at a high altitude and the climate is tundra-like.  There are not many fruits and vegetables.  After coming to South Asia, you really don’t have to follow the Tibetan custom of meat and tsampa.  There are many types of fruits and vegetables, nutritional supplements—all kinds of good foods.  Everything is available.  So there is really no need to talk about the customs of Tibet as an excuse for eating meat.  From my experience, not eating meat has many benefits.  I’m 88 and ever since I stopped eating meat, I haven’t had any major sickness.

When I sleep, I sleep well.  When I get up, I can walk right away.  When I read religious texts, I can see them properly.  I have very good hearing and can listen attentively.  These are the qualities I have experienced from not eating meat.  I didn’t get sick or die when I stopped eating meat; no negative consequences came to me.  I can travel by vehicle, airplane or train without getting nauseous or dizzy and I never get headaches.

I am a human being formed with flesh and blood like anyone else and am proof that giving up meat does not make one ill like many Tibetans seem to think.  I’m telling you from my own experience; only good things have happened to me from giving up meat.

Question:  Many Tibetans quote a sutra passage that says if one does not hear, see, or suspect that meat has been obtained especially for you, then it is acceptable to eat.  How do you respond to this?

Answer:  If the animal being killed is unseen, then it is something like stealing something without being caught.  That would also be deemed acceptable if you used this rationale. You could say something dirty without being heard—as if you need evidence to judge whether it is a sin or not.  What they say is not right.  Killing, stealing and other negative actions can never be gotten away with.  Even if other people don’t see you do them, the deities, Buddhas and Bodhisattvas see you doing these things.  There is a Tibetan saying that even if one does not get caught committing a sin, that the gods catch you every time.  It is impossible to do anything without being seen—you’re always being watched by the deities.  They see and understand what you did—they know that you helped to kill an animal by buying meat.  This is my answer.

Question:  Some monks have told me that since insects are killed in the production of rice and other vegetables, then there is really no difference in eating those things and eating meat.  What do you think about this?

Answer:  This would mean that you wouldn’t eat anything and would starve to death. If you say you were going to go for a month without killing insects through the food you eat, then you would die.  If you die, this precious human life is wasted.  So if you just let your body be destroyed, that means you are taking your own life, which is killing in itself.  You can always take the insect from the rice when you see it and let it free outside.  You don’t necessarily have to kill beings to eat.  Although, when we walk we crush many insects under our feet.  We may not see them or observe them, but still we must be killing them.  Not being aware doesn’t mean that we haven’t created any sin, because after all, cause and effect are always there.

After the interview, Rinpoche said to me, “Today you came to ask me these things and I answered them.  It is very good.  I am very happy.  You have recorded my conversation, so you should relate it to the people.  We are here at the place of Guru Rinpoche’s cave.  At this place, we are exchanging questions and answers.  It will be nice for other people to hear this.  When you make your book, put my interview at the beginning. Thank you.”

Rinpoche’s monastery at Yangleshöd has two signs posted on it related to meat eating.  The first is in Tibetan, Nepali and English and is one of the first things you see when you approach the monastery.  The sign, a full four square meters in size, reads:

IN THIS BUDDHIST MONASTERY THE CONSUMPTION OF
MEAT, ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE & TOBACCO AS WELL AS
PLAYING CARDS OR GAMBLING IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED.

One of the principal vows in Buddhism is to refrain from consuming intoxicants, along with refraining from killing, stealing, lying and sexual misconduct.  Not many Tibetan Buddhists outside of the monastic tradition take this vow seriously and Nyingma practitioners are known to drink alcohol.  Rinpoche does not tolerate this at all among his disciples.  There was an incident a few years ago where a photo of a late lama was placed in Rinpoche’s room by the disciples of this lama, who were asking Rinpoche for blessings.  When Rinpoche saw the photo, he said, “This person was an alcoholic and had broken his precepts, don’t leave this photo in my room; take it away!”

When the attendant removed the photo from the wooden frame, there was another photo beneath.  Rinpoche asked who was in the picture and was told it was the son of the late lama, who was also a heavy drinker.  Rinpoche proclaimed, “Like father, like son. Take away both of their photos!”

In regards to smoking, Rinpoche said,

“The major defect of smoking is that it will close the Brahma’s door at the top of one’s head.  So at the moment of death, it will be extremely difficult for one’s practice of phowa in trying to let one’s consciousness out from there, either to liberate oneself from cyclic existence or to go to the three upper realms.  It is most advisable for all Dharma practitioners—for the sake of both themselves and others—not to smoke at all!”

The second sign is posted outside of the main worship area and reads in Tibetan and English, “How can we practice true compassion while we consume the flesh of an animal to fatten our own flesh?  Stop this filthy habit for your health, for the environment and for the animals.”  This large poster placed in a protective frame was made by an animal rights group at Dzogchen Monastery in South India and shows how highly Rinpoche values this ethic.

The daughter of the great Nyingma figure Tarthang Tulku Rinpoche named Pema is a close friend of Chatral Rinpoche’s family.  She gave me some insights on the importance of vegetarianism in Rinpoche’s practice of compassion in my interview with her in 2000.

She said, “Meat eating is high on Chatral Rinpoche’s spiritual radar.  Rinpoche is so connected with animals.  He loves animals.  He loves watching wildlife videos on T.V.  His great compassion caused him to stop eating meat.  He gives all his money to save 70 truckloads of fish in Calcutta.  It is his most important yearly activity.

He prays for every bucketful he dumps into the ocean, trying to bring them to a higher rebirth.  In the Dharma, it is not just a matter of not doing something—eating meat for instance—but actively protecting life.  Rinpoche lives this.  He is so connected on a vast level to sentient beings and their suffering.”

Rinpoche is drawn to dark, sinful, murderous places—to Hindu animal sacrifice areas.  He took his daughter Saraswati and myself to one once.  It was beautiful on the outside, with flowers and carvings.  He bought some birds in a cage and released them at the top of the roof.  Then we came to the goat sacrifice place.  At first I had my eyes closed, but then I saw it—innocent goats being murdered and blood everywhere.  I was horrified.  Rinpoche calmly walked over the goat blood as if he was doing walking meditation.  He wasn’t a bit fazed by it.  I think he was trying to teach us the lesson of being fearless and patient in the face of suffering.

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Chatral Rinpoche’s Parinirvana


Chatral Rinpoche1

From the Compassionate Action website:

Early Life:

At the age of 15, Chatral Rinpoche decided to leave his family (circa 1928) in order to study and practice Buddhism with the masters of the area.  This act of renunciation began his life-long journey as a carefree yogi seeking Enlightenment at any cost in order to effectively help other beings with compassion.  From the onset, Rinpoche was highly principled, traveling exclusively on foot and refusing a horse when offered. He stayed only in hermitages, caves or his small tent to avoid involvement with householders and their worldly preoccupations.

Chatral Rinpoche met his root guru, Khenpo Ngawang Palzang (1879-1941) of Kathok Monastery.  The great Khenpo had been the heart disciple of Patrul Rinpoche’s main student, Lungtok Tenpai Nyima (1829-1901), and was considered to be a manifestation of the 9th Century Dzogchen master Vimalamitra.

Khenpo Ngakchung gave Chatral Rinpoche many teachings and transmissions particularly of the Longchen Nyinthig tradition.  For the next six years Rinpoche studied under him, completing his ngondro and practicing trekchod and togyal, which are some of the most advanced practices of Dzogchen.

Recognition:

Khenpo Ngawang Palzang knew Rinpoche was very special and acknowledged him to be his closest disciple, explaining that, his mind and my mind are no different.  He bestowed upon Rinpoche the name Chatral Sangye Dorje, which means “Indestructible Buddha who has Abandoned all Mundane Activities.”

The first time Chatral Rinpoche’s greatness became revealed to others was at a large worship service at Kathok Monastery, attended by several high lamas sitting on lofty thrones. Rinpoche sat in the back on a simple meditation cushion with a few hundred other monks.  Khenpo Ngawang Palzang remarked during the service: “Among all of you here today, there are less than ten people who have one-tenth of my realization.  Then, there are less than five of you who have half of my realization.”

“Finally, there is only one person here whose realization is no different from mine, and he is Chatral Sangye Dorje.  He can now represent me to transmit the teachings and his merits are the same as mine.” — Khenpo Ngawang Palzang

This proclamation caused quite a stir in the assembly hall and afterward people came to congratulate Rinpoche.  Preparations began for a grand ceremony to honor Rinpoche in his new status.  Rinpoche was not one for all this attention and praise and so snuck away in the middle of the night with his tent to continue his practice alone in the wilderness.  The next day when they came to honor him, they found his room empty with no trace of where he went.  Once again, he lived up to his name Chatral, which can be translated as hermit.

Chatral Rinpoche once explained, “We abide nowhere, we possess nothing.”   In the ultimate sense, this is a profound statement on the impermanence of life and emptiness of all things.  In the conventional sense, this is how a yogi like Chatral Rinpoche actually lived in Tibet.  Having no household or possessions to weigh on one’s mind, one is completely free to practice the Dharma.

Strict Principles:

Chatral Rinpoche was renowned for being incorruptible and insistent on doing things the right way.  In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, when someone dies, it is standard to leave them for three days to allow ample time for the consciousness to leave the body and hopefully enter into a Pureland realm or at least a high rebirth.

From the AnimalPeopleForum Chatral Rinpoche exclaimed:

“I was the first to become vegetarian since we came to India. The first year of the Nyingma Monlam in Bodh Gaya was non-vegetarian.  In the second year I came there and spoke at a meeting of all the high Nyingma Lamas.”

“I told them that Bodh Gaya is a very special place which is holy to all Buddhists, and if we say we are gathered here for the Nyingma Monlam and yet eat meat, this is a disgrace and the greatest insult to Buddhism.  I said they should all give up meat from now on, during the Nyingma Monlam.” — Chatral Rinpoche

He went on to say, “Even the Tibetan lamas and monks eat meat!  What a shame if even the lamas can’t give up meat! First the lamas should commit themselves to being life-long vegetarians.  If the Lamas become vegetarian, then you can address the lay people. Then also you should urge the monks to become vegetarian. Otherwise if knowledgeable religious people eat meat, how can one expect the ignorant public, who follow along just like sheep, to become vegetarian?”

Chatral Rinpoche was very selective about those he actually gave teachings to.  He was fully aware that most of the people who ask him for teachings are not a fraction as serious about their practice as he is, so doesn’t bother to waste the precious nectar of his teachings on an unsuitable vessel.

“There are three kinds of Dharma practitioners: firstly, there are those who look like practitioners outwardly, but inwardly they are not real practitioners; secondly, there are those who talk very high, but have no realization at all; thirdly there are those who do not look like practitioners outwardly, but who are in fact genuine practitioners inside.” — Chatral Rinpoche

Therefore as a strict rule, Rinpoche never transmitted any higher-level teachings to those who have studied with him for less than six years sufficient time for them to prove themselves as genuine practitioners.

Humility:

Despite the adulation of countless thousands in the Himalayan region, Rinpoche remains as humble as ever.  He once said, “I am just an ordinary sentient being and there is nothing special about me.  I just follow the teachings of Lord Buddha.  Without any cheating on my part, I stand firmly on the ground in practicing the Dharma and in helping all sentient beings.”

“I wish that all sentient beings could let go of the acts of self-deception and self-aggrandizement, so that they can really practice the Dharma in order to liberate themselves from cyclic existence and to help other sentient beings.  Otherwise, it will be too late when they are feeling remorseful!” — Chatral Rinpoche

On December 30th, 2015, Kyabje Chatral Sangye Dorje begin the transition to Parinirvana.  He remained in tukdam meditation until January 5th, 2016, when he attained Parinirvana.  Chatral Rinpoche passed in the 10th month on the 20th day of the Tibetan Lunar Calendar.  This Friday, December 8th, will be a great time to make butterlamp offerings and ganachakra tsok feasts in honor of this great master.

Tsok Dates:

  • 2016 – December 18th
  • 2017 – December 8th

Texts & Prayers:

Some writings of Chatral Rinpoche that include prayers, practices, pilgrimages, and words of advice:  Lotsawa House

 

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Yangthang Rinpoche Parinirvana


Venerable Yangthang Tulku Rinpoche was the immediate reincarnation of Dhomang Terchen, Dorje Dechen Lingpa.  He was the revealer of many treasure practices.  As one of the inconceivable great treasure revealers from Eastern Tibet, Dhomang Terchen was highly regarded by the greatest lamas and tertons of his time.

YTR-India

He revealed thirteen volumes during his life, which included treasures found in the earth, in lakes, in rocks, and in space, as well as pure vision treasures.  He is well known as the emanation of the great Vimalamitra, as well as Terton Lhatsun Namkha Jigmed.  Therefore, it is no surprise that his revelations also included many astonishing secret substances and materials necessary for the future propagation of Vajrayana practice.

Biography:

From PathToBuddha website:

In 1959, when the Communist Chinese invaded Tibet, Yangthang Rinpoche fled Dhomang.  He was later captured by the Chinese and imprisoned for 22 years.  He helped many fellow prisoners who could not bear the hardship to die peacefully by performing Phowa and transferring their consciousness to the Pure Land.

Though he witnessed and experienced much torture, he bears no resentment to his captors, only compassion.  In fact, he became a spiritual advisor to some of the guards.  When people express sympathy about his imprisonment, Rinpoche says that because of Dharma, his mind was more free in prison than worldly people experience in the best of circumstances.

“Because of Dharma, my mind was more free in prison than worldly people experience in the best of circumstances.” — Yangthang Rinpoche

Following the death of Mao Tse Tung he was released.  He returned to Dhomang to find his monastery completely dismantled.  He then obtained permission to go to Sikkim.  As a simple yogi he traveled back and forth to Nepal and Bhutan, receiving transmissions and empowerments from His Holiness Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche and His Holiness Dodrupchen Rinpoche.

Parinirvana:

Yangthang passed into parinirvana last year on October 15th, 2016.  So, as part of Vajrayana tradition, students and close disciples plan on doing tsok (ganachakra feasts) on the 14th day of eight month of the Tibetan Lunar Calendar.  The parinirvana date for this year falls on:

  • 2017: October 4th

Stupa:

From Yangthang’s FB page:

The “sung-jug” for the two Relic Stupas of Yangthang Rinpoche has been completed smoothly today, the auspicious Guru Rinpoche Day, at Yangthang Rinpoche’s residence in Yuksom, Sikkim.

The sacred relic of Yangthang Rinpoche, along with his bone relics, and many other holy substance have been successfully offered inside Yangthang Rinpoche’s Relic Stupa (Kutung Chorten).

Benefits:

It is said that performing the Ganachakra feast on the anniversary of the Guru’s parinirvana day will bring immeasurable benefits and negative karma accumulated over many aeons will be extinguished. 

The Tantra of the Protector Crow states:

“One who holds ceremonies during the anniversaries of the lama’s passing will attain the irreversible state and after death will be reborn in the realm of Khachod dakinis.”

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Tasihi Delek,
Neo

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Benefits of the Festival of the Tenth Day


Taken in part from the Lotsawa House website:

guru rinpoche

On each one of these successive tenth day festivals, the specific benefits of observing the practice follow in this order:

In the sixth month, all kinds of illness, döns, and obstructors are pacified, and lifespan, merit and prosperity are increased.

In the twelfth month, happiness and sharpness of mind are accelerated and confidence increases, so that humans and non-humans are brought under your power.

In the first month, power, position and wealth will grow, and earth-lords and guardians obey you like servants.

In the second month, harm and damage caused by the lord of death and the eight classes of gods and spirits are pacified, discipline is purified, and unlimited wisdom blazes.

In the third month, you are untouched by harm from inauspicious conjunctions of planets and stars, and from enemies and thieves. At home and abroad, auspiciousness, peace and goodness increase everywhere.

In the fourth month, you will be immune to harm from earth-lords, nāgas and nyens, and dharmapālas and guardians will accomplish whatever activity you have entrusted to them.

In the fifth month, all harm from obstacles, enemies and döns is pacified, and the objects of your wishes are brought under your control.

In the seventh month, chronic ailments, weaknesses of the immune system and the like are purified, the body is healthy, the mind is happy, your entourage and wealth increase, and your aspirations are fulfilled.

In the eighth month, obstacles of the year, month, day and time, as well as evil signs and the like, are all pacified, and any decline in wangthang or lungta is restored.

In the ninth month, sickness and döns caused by the eight classes and jungpo demons, untimely death and fatal accidents all are pacified, serious curses are eliminated, you are freed from sorcery and psychic attacks, and your own body becomes vajra.

In the tenth month, wrongs and downfalls of the three vows such as disrespecting sacred objects, and breakages and impairments of samaya are all healed, and your mind stream is purified.

In the eleventh month, sudden misfortune, such as untimely death, will not occur, and as soon as we transfer from this life, we are born in the pure land of Lotus Light before Guru Rinpoche himself.

Not only are the benefits of observing the tenth day absolutely limitless, but for concentrating on the various practices of gathering merit and making prayers, these occasions are praised as extraordinarily special.

Composed by Jikdral Yeshe Dorje, Kyabjé Dudjom Rinpoche

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Kilaya Drupchen


Kilaya Retreat 2017

Padmakilaya & Vajrakilaya 

with Lama Padma Gyatso

Feb 20th – 26th

Padmakilaya Empowerment: February 20th
Padmakilaya Practice: February 21st – 23rd
Vajrakilaya Practice: February 24th – 26th


Kilaya rituals are traditionally practiced during the final lunar month of the Tibetan calendar to dispel obstacles before the coming year begins (Losar). Rigdzin Ling will practice three days of Padgyal Lingpa’s terma of Padmakilaya, followed by three days of H. H. Dudjom Rinpoche’s terma of Vajrakilaya, The Razor That Destroys at a Touch. 

Padmakilaya is a revelation of the great terton, Padgyal Lingpa, who initially transmitted it directly to Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche. It became the wrathful guru practice that Rinpoche practiced exclusively for decades. It was then passed on to Tulku Sang-Ngag Rinpoche who bestowed it several times at Rigdzin Ling, authorizing Lama Padma to uphold and propagate it.

For those who wish to attend this retreat but have not received the empowerment for Vajrakilaya, there will be a blessing-permission given on the first day of the Vajrakilaya practice.

If you are unable to attend the event but would like to participate,
we encourage you to offer butterlamps and tsog

Dedications will be read during the event.

Click here for more information.

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Pilgrimage to Tibet


pilgrimage

Message from Dechen Yeshe Wangmo:

Dear Sangha,

Today, on Dudjom Rinpoche’s 30th Parinirvana Anniversary, I’m happy to announce my July 2017 Pilgrimage to Tibet! This year, we’re returning to Lhasa, Tsogyal Latso and Samye but then we’re venturing west to Everest, Kailash and Lake Manasarovar!

Everything’s in place for a sacred 19-days in Tibet for 12 pilgrims, including myself and Dechen Chodon, pilgrimage manager and trip leader.

Everything’s on the website at www.sangha-journeys.com

Everything’s ready to assist you in making this journey if it’s right for you!

Where are we going?
Lhasa (Jokhang, Ramoche, Potala, Lukhang), Tsetang Tsechu Stupa, Samye, Tsogyal Latso, Yamdrok Turquoise Lake, Gyanste Kubum Stupa, Shalu, Rong Puk, Mt. Everest Base Camp, Mt. Kailash (3-day circumambulation), Manasarovar Lake and Guge Kingdom!

Don’t delay. There’s early bird pricing!

Head-on over to the website and let us know if we can be of assistance

Tashi Delek!
Lama Dechen Yeshe Wangmo
PS: Don’t miss the Full Itinerary —detailed descriptions and photos to enjoy!

 

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The Essential Journey


It was the fifteenth day of the eleventh month of the Fire Tiger Year, January 14, 1987, when His Holiness Dudjom Rinpoche said to his wife and those close to him, “Now I have completed everything.”

dudjom-rinpoche

Usually he would do all his regular practices, and meditate and pray for people who requested his prayers in many directions, but on this day he said:

“I have completed everything, every prayer that has been asked of me.  Now I am going to leave.  Please be careful in the future to pay attention.  Karma can be very subtle and tricky.  We might think something is no big deal, but it may turn out to have serious consequences, so pay good attention to the karmic process.” — Holiness Dudjom Rinpoche

He continued, “This is what every practitioner needs to pay attention to — even those with the highest realization. I’ve done my part.”

Upon hearing this, many of those present didn’t believe him.  They thought he was making some casual statement, but soon afterwards he got sick and passed away.  This is how great ones move.

Excerpt taken from Venerable Khenpo Rinpoches:  “The Essential Journey of Life and Death“, Volume 1 (page 159)

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