Losar Celebration


Tibetan New year, also known as Losar, is the most important festival in the Tibetan calendar.  It is mainly celebrated over a period of 3 days in late January or February, according to the Tibetan calendar.  This year, Friday February 16th, will begin the year of the Earth Dog.

Losar-Celebration

Buddhist Tradition:

From the Chagdudgonpa website:

Kilaya rituals are traditionally practiced during the final lunar month of the Tibetan calendar to dispel obstacles before the new year begins (Losar).  At Rigdzin Ling we will practice three days of Padgyal Lingpa’s terma of Padmakilaya, followed by three days of HH Dudjom Rinpoche’s terma of Vajrakilaya, The Razor that Destroys at a Touch.

Kilaya Drubchöd

(Padmakilaya:  February 10 – 12, 2018 | Vajrakilaya:  February 13 – 15, 2018)

 

Padmakilaya was directly transmitted to Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche from Padgyal Lingpa, where it became the wrathful guru practice that Rinpoche practiced for decades.  It was then passed on to Tulku Sang-ngag Rinpoche who bestowed it several times at Rigdzin Ling, authorizing Lama Padma Gyatso to uphold and propagate this powerful antidote to harmful influences and emotions.

Chagdud Tulku quote

Vajrakilaya brings the practitioner into direct contact with the display of compassionate wrath, the intense energy of enlightened activity that subdues the forces of negativity.  Guru Rinpoche transmitted this method of accomplishing Vajrakilaya to his heart disciple, Yeshe Tsogyal, who made it her main practice and was the source of her extraordinary spiritual attainment.

If you are unable to attend the event but would like to participate, it is meritorious and virtuous activity to offer Butterlamps and tsog

Dedications will be read during the event.

Click here for more information.

Butter Lamp Offerings:

H.E. Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche explains:

“What is the meaning of butter lamp offerings? 

We do not offer the lamps because enlightened beings need to see them.  Rather, the offering of light is a means of dispelling the darkness of our own ignorance, giving rise to clarity and wisdom.  We offer them with the wish that their light will illuminate the lower realms and the bardo, assuaging the torment of beings who suffer in darkness.

“Of all the methods for accumulating merit through generosity, offering butter lamps is second only to the practice of tsok.” — Chagdud Tulku

We also aspire that all beings will develop greater mental clarity in order to discover the causes of long-lasting happiness in virtuous actions of body, speech, and mind.  Finally, we offer them so that the inner light of great knowing will arise in all beings’ minds and remove the darkness of ignorance and intellectual obscurations.”

Buddhas Great Miracles:

From the Kalachakrablog website:

The first full moon (March 2, 2018) in the Tibetan lunar calendar is celebrated as the Day of Miracles, or Chotrul Duchen, which commemorates the final day of miraculous display by the Buddha which lasted 15 days.  The Buddha performed the miracles in response to a challenge from six rival teachers.  These 15 days are merit‐multiplying days in which any virtue created is magnified millions of times.

“This is the best and most exciting time, whatever practice or virtue we do, the merit is increased 100 million times.” — Lama Zopa Rinpoche

The Day of Miracles is also the most special day of Monlam Chenmo, the Great Prayer Festival, where thousands of people, lay and ordained alike, pray, and make offerings of food, tea, lights or money to the Sangha.

Tashi Delek
Neo

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Filed under Masters, Tibetan Buddhism

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