The Dakini lineage


The dakini principle is the female embodiment of enlightened energy.  It is sometimes referred to as khandro in Tibetan language.  Khandro  means ‘she who traverses the sky’ or ‘she who moves in space’ or simply ‘skydancer’.  Knowing this principle is a catalyst for change and deep realization for the aspiring yogi who has respect for her loving kindness and wisdom.

Ngak’chang Rinpoche says:  “The khandro principle is what provides the inspiration for realisation – the innate magical quality of the phenomenal world in all its limitless variety.”

For men this can be perceived in female qualities – as wisdom display.  This is called: seeing the world as the dance of the khandro.

For women this can be perceived in male qualities – as method display.  This is called: seeing the world as the dance of the pawo.

Khandro Déchen continues:  “Script of this variety is known as ton-dröl, which means liberation through seeing.  Through seeing this script our consciousness is seeded with the cause of our eventual liberation.”

An excerpt from A Honey On the Razor’s Edge:

“When a man loses contact with his inner-quality, his outer-quality becomes distorted.  Disconnected from his inner khandro (his secret wisdom) his outer-quality becomes distorted.  What should be spontaneously manifested compassion, becomes neurotic assertiveness.  This assertiveness ranges from dominance to violence, depending to what extent his inner khandro has become occluded.  With regard to his spiritual life, he could becomes an academic or a great debater.  He could become a cosmic gorilla with spiritual muscles – a guru who claims to be the world teacher.

When a woman loses contact with her inner-quality, her outer quality becomes distorted.  Disconnected from her inner pawo (her secret compassion) her outer quality becomes distorted.  What should be spontaneously manifested wisdom, becomes decorativeness.  This decorativeness ranges from inconsequentiality to superficial obsession with surface appearance, depending to what extent her inner pawo has become occluded.  With regard to her spiritual life, she seems satisfied to arrange the flowers in the shrine room.  She becomes a delicate devotee.  There is no sense that she will ever actually practise; but if she does, she cultivates beautiful experiences with which to ornament her psyche.”

Marpa Lotsawa (1012–1097)

Poem by Marpa:

Although all practitioners have a lineage,

If one has the Dakini lineage, one has everything.

Although all practitioners have a grandfather,

If one has Tilo, one has everything.

Although practitioners have a lama,

If one has Naro, one has everything.

Although practitioners have teachings,

If one has the hearing lineage, one has everything.

All attain the Buddha through meditation,

But if one attains Buddhahood without meditation,

There is definite enlightenment.

There is no amazing achievement without practice,

But there is amazing achievement without practice.

By searching, all will find enlightenment,

But to find without searching is the greatest find.

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1 Comment

Filed under Masters, Tibetan Buddhism

One response to “The Dakini lineage

  1. Pingback: a lesson in humility | Dharma Talks

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