Three divisions of generosity


There are three divisions of the paramita of generosity (Skt. dana): the generosity of Wealth, Knowledge, and Protection.

  1. The generosity of WEALTH is developed when we give material aid to others in need, offering assistance without hesitation or regret and with the pure intention that they be happy.
  2. Giving KNOWLEDGE involves teaching the Dharma, which will immediately and ultimately lead them out of suffering.
  3. The Venerable Khenpo Rinpoches explain that the generosity of PROTECTION “applies to situations such as knowing that someone is going to be killed or executed and helping him or her escape, compassionately offering ransom, or, in less extreme cases, doing whatever you can do to protect the lives of others. This applies to all sentient beings: it is not limited to certain groups, but extends to any sentient being you see who is going to die or be killed. Offering this kind of protection is very, very special. It is a great gift, because life is precious to everyone.”

The benefits of saving the lives of other beings while praying for their happiness is beyond imagination: This practice is said to be the best way to prolong one’s own life, and is the most helpful act for living and deceased beings.

“Offering care to those in danger, results in merit equal to meditating on emptiness endowed with compassion – the union of relative and absolute bodhichitta.” — the great master Atisha

Saving Lives of animals:

Wherever ransoming the lives of others is performed, sickness among people and animals lessens, harvests are more abundant, and lives are longer; the moment of death leads more easily to higher rebirth for both the animal and the person who engages in ransoming, and this practice will eventually lead to supreme enlightenment.

MAKE YOUR DONATION NOW

Through the Padmasambhava Buddhist Center

$25 USD per 100 fish released, which includes liberation puja and prayers.

To perform this good root of virtue click here:  Animal Release Program

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